What’s the morale from “Hatching Twitter”?

I’m not sure if I like or hate the story of Twitter. For the past few days I’m reading “Hatching Twitter” by Nick Bilton. The story is amazing, it’s like a soap opera written by the best screen writer.

There are lessons to be learned by Entrepreneurs, by friends and by business people. It’s enjoyable to read although in many cases it makes my stomach ache…

The main theme that comes across – you can’t do successful (and failing in case of Odeo) startup with friends, you’ll end up with no friends.

Read it, let me know what you think?

 

 

Blueprint for Customer Success

Tien Tzuo, CEO and Founder of Zuora the subscription billing company is well known within the SaaS industry. He had coined the term ‘Subscription Economy’ and has been pushing heavily for subscription model adoption by many companies.

When I approached Tien to speak at the Customer Success Summit – he immediately agreed. He promised that he has a very good story to share with the audience. Tien openly admitted to Zuora’s challenges with meeting customer expectations and keeping the promise, which is what Customer Success is about.

In this video presentation, Tien not only shares the challenge but also the proposed customer success solution they have implemented at Zuora. Tien is also doing this in a very engaging way, I’m sure you’ll enjoy.

No! to Customer Love

Just listen, let me know what you think?

6 Customer Success Secrets

In the 2nd annual customer success summit last month in San Francisco, I’ve introduced the Customer Success Manifesto. If you are familiar with the agile software development manifesto will see a similar presentation style (visuals are updated to 2014 though).

The Customer Success Manifesto should be viewed as 6 rules for great customer success. I’ve decided to work on a crisp defintion for the term Customer Success by defining what it is and what it is not for myself first and foremost for Totango’s team and customers and the industry in general.

Customer Success Summit: Customer Success Manifesto from Totango on Vimeo.

BTW, the reason it took me a minute or two during the key note to get to my ‘high note’ was a very long preparation cycle that ended at 3am the night (morning?) before the event.

Happy to get your feedback and thoughts…

Smart Customer Success

Yesterday I’ve had a pleasure to co-host a webinar with John Broady, GM of thismoment a great brand management company.

The focus of the webinar and the case-study John shared was about creating and ensuring value to customers as the blood-line of a SaaS company.

I’ve enclosed the slides just below – enjoy!

R.I.P Lou Reed

Lou Reed Past away today at the age of 71. Didn’t know the man. Just his music. I’m sad today.
Here’s the best version of ‘sweet jane’ that I recommend. enjoy.

Follow Totango on LinkedIn – Please?!

I had a bet with the marketing team that I alone can increase Totango LinkedIn followers by 500 people in a day.

Help me prove I’m right, by follow the link below and click the follow button:

http://www.linkedin.com/company/totango

We’re now using LinkedIn as the main channel for company news and updates, and promise only high quality content there…

Thanks!
Guy

Really care about your customers

I came across this great video. It’s a bit long – over an hour but genuinely make great points on the importance of caring about your customers, something I believe in with all of my heart.

Enjoy!

 

When service is down – how open should you be?

Admitting Failure

Yesterday we’ve experienced probably the worse production down-time that we had since we’ve launched Totango. The intentions were good, we’ve upgrades a significant part of our infrastructure that we’ve worked on for months and unfortunately this upgrade didn’t go smooth…

We’ve been working around the clock to resolve the problem, and at the same time I felt that it’s important to openly communicate to our customers directly, with a message within the application, thru email to all of our admins, and on the company blog about the situation and to keep everybody up to date.

We’ve started getting feedback from our blog readers that we should have not have used public communication to report about the service problem. Some people of the team felt the same way, as this could very well become an ammunition to our competition, and may scare off potential customers who are in the process of evaluating our service.

This is a tough decision – how open and transparent should we really be?

I guess the world is divided into two camps:

  1. Information on a need to know basis
  2. Open and Transparent

Clearly, me and the team are part of camp #2. I believe that by being open and transparent, even at cases of failures, we will get credit for admitting to problems and resolving those.

However, option #1 should not be dismissed easily. There are many companies that keep very good image without exposing their failures publicly.

What do you think? What would you do?